CPD, Objective Measures and Effort Faces!

Last week Amelia and I had a great catch-up and CPD session at our sports injury clinic in Bedale. We try to do this once a month, and work on various aspects of Sports Therapy, from the business side to joint assessment review (our last session was the wrist and hand). This session focussed on objective measures, in particular the use of a simple crane scale, clips and furniture lifting straps in measuring leg strength. This is as simple and effective way of obtaining a measure of the difference in strength between the right and left sides.

Crane Scale

We devised set-ups for measuring knee extension and a seated calf raise, please excuse the faces we’re pulling, but the effort was real!

This was a simple and inexpensive way of getting a measure of the force generated during the movement and applied to the lifting straps. The benefits of this set-up lie in the objective measurement of injuries such as anterior crucial ligament reconstructions and Achilles’ tendon injuries. My thanks to Eric Meira (@erikMeira) for the idea and we’re looking forward to utilising it more during future sessions.

Best wishes

Ed

The Reformer or the Rack?

My experience with a Pilates Reformer at The Pilates Studio, Yarm.

So when Helen Smith owner of Yarm Pilates studio first described the Pilates Reformer to me, the mental image it conjured up was not exactly enticing and thoughts of medieval torture kept popping into my head:

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Medieval rack has definite similarities!

Helen, however, assured me that it was great for loads of different exercises and so we arranged a time for me to have a go. What I found surprised me, other than the similarities in size and shape, it was nothing like a medieval rack!

Under Helens guidance, we started to go through just a few of the many exercises you can do on the reformer, working the legs, trunk muscles and arms. The Reformer adds adaptable resistance to the movements (by adding / removing springs), which change the feel of many of the common Pilates exercises. I found that there were definite similarities to some gymnastics strength training exercises, such as weighted mobility drills.

Using the Reformer was an interesting experience and hopefully, we’ll get a few more sessions in to really get to grips with it. It won’t be for everyone (nothing ever is), for those who have tried Pilates, I would definitely recommend it as a way of adding a bit of a twist. Helen is a great teacher who focuses on and promotes movement rather than holding a bracing, which is great to see. I did end up in some rather strange and unflattering positions though!

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Pilates Reformer rollbacks.

The Pilates Studio, Yarm is located on Yarm High Street and offers several friendly Pilates classes with great instructors to suit all levels, as well as 1-1 Reformer sessions. My clinic is at the studio on a Thursday afternoon / evening and appointments can be made via the Book Online button.

Have you heard yourself?

This is just a quick post to get me back into (or even started!) writing blog posts. I thought I’d start with a question.

Have you ever listened to how you run?

I’ve spent some time over the last few months, with the change in seasons, analysing clients gait when running or walking. Something that keeps cropping up is the noise, or lack of, that they make when running. Lots of us run listening to music and probably pay very little attention to how WE sound.

So next time you’re out or at the gym have a listen: are you loud with “slappy feet” or a heavy tread or quiet as a mouse? Is there a difference between your right and left sides? I’m not saying that quiet running is the answer, but it would suggest less impact and listening to yourself run may just make you more aware of what’s going on in your own body.

Enjoy!